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Considering Empowerment: Stories of Self-Advocacy from South Africa

Dr. Jean Elphick speaks at HPOD

A group of determined mothers tirelessly campaign for their children’s rights to free, inclusive education. Children from a school for learners with educational support needs become the leaders in a peer education movement to teach young people about human rights. Using posters and colour, children raise their voices to break the ‘consp…

Welcome

Welcome to the new Harvard Law School Project on Disability website. HPOD was founded in 2004 to advance the understanding and implementation of disability law, policy, and education around the world. On this site, you’ll find information about the work HPOD does in the U.S. and abroad; information about our events and publications; communit…

HPOD supports European Independent Living

HPOD Executive Director Michael Stein will present remarks at a side-session convened during the High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development.

HPOD wins CRPD Voting Rights Victory

The United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities issued a landmark decision on the voting rights of persons with intellectual disabilities.

The United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities issued a landmark decision on the voting rights of persons with intellectual disabilities. The Committee held that disenfranchisement of persons with disabilities is unacceptable under the CRPD, ordered Hungary to repeal its Basic Law and voting legislation, and required it to …

HPOD supports UNICEF Global Partnership

HPOD will participate as a Member in the second round of UNICEF’s Global Partnership for Children with Disabilities. HPOD Executive Director Michael Stein will present remarks.

Senate rejects United Nations treaty for disabled rights in a 61-38 vote

A United Nations treaty to ban discrimination against people with disabilities went down to defeat in the Senate on Tuesday in a 61-38 vote.

The treaty, backed by President Obama and former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.), fell five votes short of the two-thirds majority needed for confirmation as dozens of Senate Republicans objected that it would create new abortion rights and impede the ability of people to homeschool disabled children. Sen. James Inhofe (R-Okla.) argued th…